Author: Basil Peters

Exits Execution

Exit Execution Workshop (Philadelphia) Part 1: Only 25% have successful exits.   Strategic Exits Partner Emeritus, Dr. J. Basil Peters, developed and implemented several new concepts in selling technology companies. His seminal publication: Early Exits demonstrated that entrepreneurs and their angel investors could earn better returns by sell...

Exits Execution

Exit Execution Workshop (Philadelphia) Part 2: Accidental Exits case studies This is the second in a series of eight posts on Exits Execution – the Philadelphia Series. Basil explains the key considerations in executing an optimal exit for your technology company. The Exit Execution series follows the Exit Preparation presentation and Exit Strategies - The Waterloo Series available on the exits.partners blog. This Exit Execution workshop was f...

Exits Execution

Exit Execution Workshop (Philadelphia) Part 3: What does this mean for you? This is the third in a series of eight posts on Exits Execution – the Philadelphia Series. In this session, Basil explodes some of the myths around the theory of exits. The Exit Execution series follows the Exit Preparation presentation and Exit Strategies - The Waterloo Series available on the exits.partners blog. The Exit Execution workshop was first presented at ...

Exits Strategy

Strategic Exits Partner Emeritus, Dr. J. Basil Peters, developed and implemented several new concepts in selling technology companies. His seminal publication: Early Exits demonstrated that entrepreneurs and their angel investors could earn better returns by selling their technology companies earlier in their business development. He also promoted the concept that the company exit was a key business process and should drive the company’s strategic a...

Exits Strategy

This post is number 2 in a five-part series of posts on Exits Strategies. In this post Basil Peters explains how rapid changes in technology and business have created a unique opportunity for acquisitions of early stage and growth stage technology companies. The boom started in the early 2010s and has continued for more than a decade, the longest bull run in history, despite a volatile economy and financial markets upset by the COVID pandemic. This...

Valuation

Valuing a tech company today has to be done much differently than five or ten years ago. In the old days (like 5 or 10 years ago) tech companies were more often valued using old economy methods. These were usually multiples of key financial metrics like profit, revenue and growth rate. This article was written by our Emeritus Founder almost a decade ago. It's a good description of how tech company v...

Exits Classics

How Often Do You See Smart People Leaving a Big Company? Here’s a typical article from a couple of days ago: Microsoft Loses Key Public Sector, Visual Studio, and Bing Execs (UPDATED) The article starts off with: “Several high-ranking Microsoft executives exited the company this week.” And ends ...

Exits Classics

This was a talk to several hundred M&A professionals at the Association of Mergers & Acquisitions Advisors annual conference. The organizers asked me to discuss ways to increase the final selling price and gave me this title to work with. Key Points: The first step: Hire a really good M&A Advisor – seriously Isn’t going “from 3x to 7x” the main reason to hire an M&A Advisor? Selling a business for 3x is a heck ...

Exits Strategy

I'm convinced that only about 25% of saleable businesses end up having successful exits. Yes. I believe that about 75% of the time, when a company could have been successfully sold, the result was either a transaction at prices or terms below market - or even worse - no sale at all. Most of the time, it was preventable. The biggest reason this happens is simply due to a lack of knowledge. The Frustrating Lack of Data on Exits One of the ...

Exits Classics

I was a little sad listening to President Obama talk about his job creation plans last week. Most of us in North America would agree that our highest economic priority is finding ways to create more new jobs. My take on Obama’s plans is that he proposes to borrow more, or tax more, to subsidize companies to hire the people who are least employable. He also plans to require companies to “buy American” as long as that won’t increase prices...